Recent Publications

Our Author(s):
By Brent Sohngen, Robert Mendelsohn, and Roger Sedjo This paper addresses the effectiveness of tree planting and forest conservation strategies to increase the sink of carbon in global forests. Because forests are expected to sequester additional carbon without explicit human intervention, a baseline case is presented. The baseline predicts that forests will sequester an additional 17.9 Pg (1015 grams) of carbon over the next 150 years, with nearly 95% of this accruing to storage in marketed forest products. The paper then compares strategies which assume markets adjust to changes in future...
Vickner, Steven S., Dana L. Hoag, W. Marshall Frasier, and James C. Ascough II. “A Dynamic Economic Analysis of Nitrate Leaching in Corn Production under Nonuniform Irrigation Conditions.” American Journal of Agricultural Economics. 80(Number 2, 1998):397-408 Click Here
Vickner, Steven S. and Dana L. Hoag. “Advances in Ration Formulation for Beef Cattle through Multiple Objective Decision Support Systems.” In Multiple Objective Decision Making for Land, Water and Environmental Management. Edited by Samir A. El-Swaify and Diana S. Yakowitz. Boca Raton, FL: Lewis Publishers, 1998:291-298 (ISBN 1-57444-091-8) Click Here
Our Author(s):
(with Md. Nazmul Hassan) Using a unique panel dataset that includes linked data on migrants and origin households, we assess the impact of information asymmetries. Variation in travel times is used to generate variation in the cost of communication between migrants and origin households. However, because migration, as well as the destination, may be chosen with information asymmetries in mind, two sets of instrumental variables are employed: wages and migrant networks at potential destinations. Preliminary results suggest that both migrants and origin households face agency problems...
Our Author(s):
(with Olga Kondratjeva) This paper uses data from the Living Standards Measurement Survey 1998 and 2005 from Nicaragua to identify the effect of borrowing behavior on children’s schooling. It examines how much schooling children obtain, when comparing children from borrowing and non-borrowing households and children from households with a male and a female borrower. Findings of the econometric analysis indicate that girls from non-borrowing households compared to girls from households with a female borrower and boys from non-borrowing households compared to boys from households with a male...
Our Author(s):
(with Mark M. Pitt) This paper describes the energy transition in Indonesia and examines the determinants of energy demand, by fuel. The key innovation of this paper is the documentation of how these relationships have evolved over time. We find that parameter change, defined as changes in the magnitude of the effect of parameters (e.g., income, demographic characteristics) on consumer demand, explains the large majority of changes in energy demand. Demographic change is found to play an important role in accelerating the energy transition, with parameter change magnifying this effect even...
Our Author(s):
(with Katrina Kosec and Valerie Mueller) Migration is a known livelihood strategy for the rural poor. Research on mobility and its impact on household welfare is seldom investigated due to the omission of pertinent questions on standard household surveys. Furthermore, the framing of questions can lead to the computation of misleadingly, low migration rates and household well-being measures depending on the respondent, recall period, and inclusion of the absent migrant’s income. In 2013-4, 726 original households of the Pakistan Rural Household Panel Survey (1986-1991) were resurveyed. The...
Our Author(s):
The Bangladesh Delta is at the confluence of the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghna Rivers and home to over 158 million people with a high growth rate of ~2.5 million people per year. It is continuously threatened by monsoonal flooding, sea-level rise, saltwater intrusion, sediment load, coastal erosion, land subsidence, blockage of river run-off, and accelerated mountain glacier melt. In the face of such climate variability, residents face tremendous environmental risk related to annual crop/income loss as well as potentially permanent loss of assets and livelihoods. This paper uses a long-...
The use of development impact fees to finance public facilities that are necessary to service new growth is a practice that has gained importance and acceptance in the last decade. In the U.S. the practice and widespread use of the DIF are asymmetric. Even though DIF are widely accepted, many public officials, developers and the general public do not yet understand the need for DIF and their effect on the economy. There are important policy and legal issues involved. Selected state experience is reviewed here. By Lawrence Libby

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