In the Press

8/15
The natural value of the Lake Erie region is $443 billion, according to a year-long consultant’s report prepared for the cities of Toledo and Oregon, as well as for Lucas County commissioners.
8/13
More than one in seven acres in Ohio went unplanted for farmers in the federal crop insurance program, the highest rate in the country. In some Ohio counties, nearly half of agricultural land lies fallow after heavy spring rains prevented crops from being planted.
8/7
Ohio farmland tax valuations continue to decline across the state according to a new study from Ohio State University.
7/25
A study by an international team of agriculture scientists says that in some areas of Nepal, children’s dependency on local food may not help them become as tall as the kids from other parts of the world. Researchers Leah Bevis, David Guerena and Kichan Kim say that many of Nepal’s soils, like that of other countries in South Asia, are poor in terms of the availability of zinc, a major nutrient needed for cognitive and physical development of human beings.
7/15
Democrats worry about lack of labor protection enforcement and Republicans believe it help Ohio manufacturers and farmers.
7/4
A study finds that close to a trillion trees could potentially be planted on Earth—enough to sequester more than 200 billion tons of carbon. But environmental change on this scale is no easy task.
6/25
Growers who opt not to plant corn or soybeans this year because of consistently wet fields would be best off not leaving those fields bare, according to an expert at The Ohio State University.
6/12
Ed and Iwonne Schardein keep their only son’s ashes in an urn next to their TV set. In their sparsely decorated living room, the immense flat screen TV dwarfs everything else. “To this day I still expect him to walk through the door,” says Iwonne. Pictures of Casey hang on all four walls, his jovial smile framed by a scraggly beard and a baseball cap. The young man from Hope, Kansas, had just turned 26 when he died.
5/24
According to the United States’ original 1950 urban classifications, rural America is crushing it. It’s home to about as many people as urban America, and it’s growing faster. So why do headlines and statistics paint rural areas as perpetually in decline?
5/30
Soybeans may not seem all that useful in a war. Nonetheless they’ve become China’s most important weapon in its ever-worsening trade conflict with the U.S.

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